logo community by design, inc.

About Us | Services | Projects | Related Links

Home | Site Map | Contact Us

project overview
plan drawings
general development
support information
a unique opportunity
questions and answers

Horeb's Corners Support Information
Zoning Bullet Point Sheet

“From local zoning codes to federal automobile subsidies, there is a long list of regulatory forces that have proved destructive to communities in unexpected ways” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

“While New Urbanism is still strongly discouraged by most subdivision and zoning ordinances, an increasing number of local jurisdictions are approving laws that allow mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented developments” (“Local Laws Change to Accommodate Human-Scale Neighborhoods”, New Urban News, November/December 1998).

“One Warning: Experience suggests that it is a mistake to try to fix old zoning codes. Attempting to change a typical words-and-numbers ordinance into a physical-form-based ordinance through deletions and additions, chewing gum and baling wire, will result in a new ordinance that is even more confusing and difficult to implement than the old one.

back to top

In most municipalities, the best way to thoroughly upgrade a development code is to start from scratch, which is not in itself a difficult task. The problem lies not in creating a new ordinance but in throwing out the old one” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

“In a growing number of municipalities and counties in the U.S., new urbanism is providing a framework for local planning, zoning and revitalization” (“Local Officials Jump on the Bandwagon”, New Urban News, September/October 1996).

”…as long as the zoning codes favor low-density development over the creation of compact communities, developers will not be able to shake their reputation as land rapists, as they turn farm after farm into cookie-cutter sprawl” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

“While the New Urbanism is still strongly discouraged by most subdivision and zoning ordinances, an increasing number of local jurisdictions are approving laws that allow mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented developments” (“Local Laws Change to Accommodate Human-Scale Neighborhoods”, New Urban News, November/December 1998).

“If our communities are to recover from sprawl, they need both new regulations and a new regulatory environment. Existing zoning ordinances typically outdated, complicated, and vulnerable to influence peddling are often discrediting but rarely discarded. The flaws of these ordinances are too many to mention here, but can be gleaned through even cursory reading. Most need radical restructuring just to open the door for traditional neighborhood development. New regulations, in addition to making traditional neighborhoods possible, must support the character of older places through the compatible filling in of existing neighborhoods. This is the opposite of what happens in most historic communities today, where modern building codes force new construction to take a form drastically distinct from that of its neighborhood” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

back to top

”…the application in the city of suburban zoning standards, with their deeper setbacks and higher parking requirements, prevented the renovation of existing buildings, which became illegal under the new code” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

“Neotraditional development projects face considerable challenges gaining approval, because they require a mix of uses and housing types, narrower streets, smaller setbacks and other deviations from standard zoning codes” (“Fighting Against the Tide”, New Urban News, January/February 1997).

”Zoning required the artificial creation of “affordable housing,” because the rules of zoning prohibit the very conditions that formerly made housing available to all income groups and integrated it into the civic fabric” (James Howard Kunstler, Home From Nowhere, 1996).

”Under the of zoning and the professional overspecialization that is fostered, all streets were made as wide as possible because the specialist in charge the traffic engineer was concerned solely with the movement of cars and trucks. In the process much of the traditional décor that made streets pleasant for people was gotten rid of” (James Howard Kunstler, Home From Nowhere, 1996).

back to top

Overview | Drawings | Development Plan | Support | Presentations | Q & A

Home | Projects | Site Map | Contact Us