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Horeb's Corners Support Information
Mix of Uses Bullet Point Sheet

“Where appropriate, new development contiguous to urban boundaries should be organized as neighborhoods and districts, and be integrated with the existing urban pattern. Noncontiguous development should be organized as towns and villages with their own urban edges, and planned for a job/housing balance, not a bedroom suburb”
(Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter for the New Urbanism, 2000).

”To provide adequate opportunities for business and employment growth, I believe that as much as 30 percent of a mixed-use town or neighborhood core should accommodate different kinds of workplaces. The core also needs cafes and other services that support workers, as well as diverse building types with room for expansion and evolution” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

“All TODs must be mixed-use and contain a minimum amount of public, core, commercial and residential uses. Vertical mixed-use buildings are encouraged, but are consider a bonus to the basic horizontal mixed-use requirement” (Peter Calthorpe, The Next American Metropolis, 1993).

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”Within neighborhoods, a broad range of housing types and price levels can bring people of diverse ages, races, and incomes into daily interaction, strengthening the personal and civic bonds essential to an authentic community” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

“While the population density may vary, depending on its context, each model offers a balanced mix of dwellings, workplaces, shops, civic buildings and parks” (Peter Katz, The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community, 1994).

“The conventional suburban practice of separating land uses by ‘zones’ us the legacy of early industrial workplaces that were once of genuine concern to public welfare. Today, since most industry and commercial activities are benign, few industries need to be separated from other uses.” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

“The model of creating a fine-grained mix of uses, with civic, institutional, and commercial located within easy walking distance of each other, provides the greatest accessibility of daily activities to the greatest number of people” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

”The isolation of most uses in large single-use complexes makes them all but impossible to access by foot and has led to the average person today making 12 car trips daily for work, schools, and shopping” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

“Regardless of location, a new neighborhood can avoid unduly contributing to sprawl by being of mixed use. At the bare minimum, every residential neighborhood must include a corner store to provide its residents with their daily needs, from orange juice to cat food. While it is only a start, a small corner store does wonders to limit automobile trips out of the development, and does more than a social club to build the bonds of community” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

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“The neighborhood has a balanced mix of activities: shopping, work, schooling, recreation, and all types of housing” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

“The corner store is, of course, only the first step toward a true mix of uses. A neighborhood-scale shopping center may be appropriate for a larger population or when adjacent to through traffic. Such as concentration of retail—around 20,000 square feet, including groceries, dry cleaner, video rental, and other daily needs—should be designed as part of any large development in anticipation of future demand….A mixed-use neighborhood also includes places to work, the more the better” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

“Cities and towns should bring into proximity a broad spectrum of public and private uses to support a regional economy that benefits people of all incomes. Affordable housing should be distributed throughout the region to match job opportunities and to avoid concentration of poverty” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

“Ideally, every neighborhood should be designed with an even balance of residents and jobs. While this flies in the ace of convention, it is not impossible to implement. All that is needed is for the housing and commercial developers to agree to work in the same location with a coordinated plan. When there is only one developer for both, it is even easier” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

“Neighborhoods should be compact, pedestrian-friendly, and mixed-use” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

“At a minimum, retail, housing, and public uses are required in all TODs…The different mix of uses for Neighborhood TODs is intended to reflect the variations in intensity and type of development desired at these sites” (Peter Katz, The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community, 1994).

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“The neighborhood provides housing for a range of incomes” (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

”The neighborhood is emphatically mixed-use and provides housing for people with different incomes. Buildings may be various in function but must be compatible with one another in size and their relation to the street. The needs of daily life are accessible within the five-minute walk. Commerce is integrated with residential, business and even manufacturing use, though not necessarily on the same street in a given neighborhood. Apartments are permitted over stores. Forms of housing are mixed, including apartment, duplex and single-family houses, accessory apartments and outbuildings” (James Howard Kunstler, Home From Nowhere, 1996).

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