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Horeb's Corners Support Information
Alley Bullet Point Sheet

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”Back yards, garages, and service areas are screened from the public by the houses themselves. (Even blank wall, high fence, or garage door facing the street weakens the relationship between the house and the street and its residents’ ability to maintain security)”
(Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter for the New Urbanism, 2000).

”…rear-loaded parking improves the streetscape by eliminating numerous driveways and the sight of cars parked in driveways” (“15 Ways to Fix the Suburbs”, Newsweek, May 15, 1995).

“Alley accessed garages relieve the street side of the house from being dominated by garage doors and cramped by curb cuts” (Peter Calthorpe, The Next American Metropolis, 1993).

“…by reducing driveway entrances, the space on the street can be used more efficiently for additional parking needs” (American Society of Civil Engineers, National Association of Home Builders, Urban Land Institute, “Residential Streets”, 1990).

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“Alleys are also appreciated by the fire chief, since they allow firefighters another path to the building” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

“Alleys can assist site designers by allowing narrower lots, and the enhance safety by eliminating front driveways and the associated backing movements across sidewalks and into streets” (ITE Transportation Planning, Traditional Neighborhood Development: Street Design Guideline, June 1997).

”Alleys provide an opportunity to put the garages in the rear, allowing the more “social” aspects of the home to front the street” (Peter Calthorpe, The Next American Metropolis, 1993).

“Alleys also give street-front residents one side of their lot that is more public, toward the street, and another that is more neighborhood oriented (along the alley)” (ITE Transportation Planning, Traditional Neighborhood Development: Street Design Guidelines, June 1997).

“Beverly Hills, California, which no one has ever accused of being unsightly, has alleys, and they work just fine, allowing the street in front of the house to remain beautiful even on garbage day” (A Better Place to Live, 1994).

“Planning for the pedestrian begins with the creation of an interconnected network of streets, midblock passages, alleys, pocket parks, and trails that provide lots of options for reaching any particular place. (Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter of the New Urbanism, 2000).

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“The only way to free narrow-lot houses from the aesthetic burden of the garage is to place it at the rear of the lot, and the most efficient way to access a rear garage is through a rear lane, or alley” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

“Alleys can also have secondary or reduced-sized dwelling units that are free-standing or are above garages along the alley. Such housing helps to aid safety concerns along alleys by providing “eyes” (in the form of residents) along the alley” (ITE Transportation Planning, Traditional Neighborhood Development: Street Design Guidelines, June 1997 also found in The Death and Life of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs).

“The alley is often criticized for its lack of neatness, but that is its essence: it’s where the messy stuff goes. From garage doors to trash containers, transformers, electrical meters, and telephone equipment the alley takes them out of public view, something that is all the more necessary these days with the advent of recycling bins and cable TV boxes. Also, by handling many of the neighborhood’s underground utilities, alleys allow streets to be narrower and to be planted with trees, which becomes difficult when water, sewer, gas, electricity, cable, and telephone are all placing demands on the front right-of-way” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

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”Front porches are the semi-private spaces that create opportunities for social interaction within a neighborhood and bring eyes to the street, rather than isolating communities behind garage doors” (Peter Calthorpe, The Next American Metropolis, 1993).

“Alleys may also provide direct access to backyard granny flats, giving them an address independent of the main house” (Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream, 2000).

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